Tag archive

buildings

Premiere of Innovative Low-Carbon Cement: Will ‘Be in That Building for Decades to Come’

in Uncategorized 413 views

Two firms in Boston have just laid the foundations of a large building using a USA-made zero-carbon cement mixture, representing one of the first adoptions of this technology in the real world.

Many companies are testing or subsidizing low/zero carbon cement and concrete hoping to reduce their carbon footprint, but few as yet are using it liberally to build real structures.

Manufactured by Sublime Systems, which was just named to Fast Company Magazine’s Most Innovative Companies in Sustainability for 2024, the firm uses an electrochemical process to create the cement for ready-mix products.

At the heart of traditional Portland and other kinds of cement is its heating in a kiln wherein calcium carbonate reacts with silica-bearing minerals to form a mixture of calcium silicates. Over a billion tonnes of cement are made per year, and cement kilns are the heart of this production process: heating the mixture to over 1,300°C and producing around 5% of all made-made carbon emissions worldwide, according to The Economist.

By eliminating the kiln altogether, Sublime Systems has removed the large majority of emissions from the process.

Best of all, it’s actually being used right now in the Greater Boston Area. Boston Sand & Gravel is supplying Turner Construction Co. with ready-mix cement containing Sublime Systems’ product to form the mud mat of a large building.

“It’s going to be in that building for decades to come,” Leah Ellis, Sublime Systems’ CEO, told Engineering News Record.

Continue Reading on GOODNEWSNETWORK

Across Florida, Buildings Are Quietly and Quickly Being Assembled with Real-Life LEGO Bricks

in Housing 303 views

A Florida construction firm is seeing fast adoption of its intuitively-made building blocks that work like real-life LEGO bricks.

The interlocking blocks made of a mineral composite and reinforced with glass fiber can be quickly and quietly assembled into walls, floors, and even roofs, with a special adhesive and a rubber mallet being the only tools workers need to get the job done.

By using a process similar to injection molding, Renco USA can take the material and turn it into a variety of shapes, from the standard LEGO bricks to roofbeams and joists. No heavy cutting, welding, or masonry is needed on the job site, and contractors installing plumbing, ventilation, or electrical work can treat the finished block walls like normal concrete.

In Palm Springs, a $21 million, 96-unit housing complex near West Palm Beach is being built by just 11 workers using the blocks and adhesive. Without any cranes or lifts, and no bench saws or metal cutting equipment, the neighbors heard only the muted thud of the rubber mallets.

According to industry reporters, ongoing labor shortages and volatile markets in both steel and concrete are making America’s go-to building strategy for over 100 years more and more difficult to budget for.

Renco’s building system combines standard materials from other industries, like methyl methacrylate glue used in heavy vehicle manufacturing, and recycled glass fiber to reinforce the stability of supply chains and make costs lower and more predictable.

Continue Reading on GOODNEWSNETWORK

Vacant Office Near D.C. Turns Into Indoor Farm–Using Empty Buildings to Grow Food

in Food 250 views

Arlington, Virginia is like a gateway to the city of Washington D.C. Part of the Metro line, but across the Potomac, it’s nevertheless a busy area and not the kind of place you’d expect to be able to get minutes-old, farm-fresh produce.

But Area 2 Farms is growing greens, herbs, and root vegetables in a vertical farm thanks to the dearth of traditional office tenants. With high-rise office space remaining vacant even after the end of the pandemic, landlords are open to ideas.

Jackie Potter and Tyler Baras pitched the idea of an indoor farm and it was obviously a good one because Area 2 is already well-established in the Arlington area such that they offer subscription delivery of fresh veggies to fellow urbanites starting at $40 per week.

Arlington, Virginia is like a gateway to the city of Washington D.C. Part of the Metro line, but across the Potomac, it’s nevertheless a busy area and not the kind of place you’d expect to be able to get minutes-old, farm-fresh produce.

But Area 2 Farms is growing greens, herbs, and root vegetables in a vertical farm thanks to the dearth of traditional office tenants. With high-rise office space remaining vacant even after the end of the pandemic, landlords are open to ideas.

Jackie Potter and Tyler Baras pitched the idea of an indoor farm and it was obviously a good one because Area 2 is already well-established in the Arlington area such that they offer subscription delivery of fresh veggies to fellow urbanites starting at $40 per week.

Continue Reading on GOODNEWSNETWORK

Watertown downtown facade program facing delays

in Local News 292 views

WATERTOWN — The plan was to add 50 awnings on 10 downtown buildings by now, but the availability of contractors and materials have delayed completion of downtown’s $460,000 facade improvement project.

The work, funded by the city’s $10 million in Downtown Revitalization Initiative funds awarded in 2017, was originally going to be finished a year ago. The COVID-19 pandemic has also slowed the progress of the facade work.

The Watertown Local Development Corp., also known as the Watertown Trust, is overseeing the DRI facade program, while Neighbors of Watertown Inc. is arranging the work with contractors.

Watertown Trust CEO Donald W. Rutherford and his Watertown Trust board members are worried that the city will lose the DRI funding if the facade improvements don’t get done by a state-required deadline.

It’s now crunch time to put the facade program to bed, they said.

Recently, the New York Department of State granted an extension to get the work started by Oct. 1 and completed by April 30, 2023.

“That’s 90 days,” Mr. Rutherford said. “I just don’t see it.”

But Neighbors of Watertown Executive Director Reginald J. Schweitzer Jr. said not to worry. He expects that most of the work will be done this construction season.

Continue Reading on NNY360

Watertown hopes to sell 19 vacant lots, 4 buildings via RFP process

in Local News/Place 324 views

WATERTOWN — The city hopes to unload 19 vacant lots and four buildings that it acquired after they went through a two-year redemption period for back taxes.

The Watertown City Council has instructed staff to sell the properties through a request for proposal process, rather than auctioning them off.

The city has issued itself a deed for the properties after no one showed any interest in acquiring their tax sale certificates during an auction in June.

The four buildings are a dilapidated apartment building at 542 Cooper St.; a single-family house at 256 Pleasant St.; a former commercial building that’s been converted to a residence at 405 Arsenal St.; and a manufactured home at 850 Superior St.

Continue Reading on NNY360

Convalt Energy buys two Watertown buildings, starts moving equipment from Oregon

in Local Business 398 views

WATERTOWN — Convalt Energy is purchasing two buildings that were once part of the city’s industrial history and now will be used to store solar panel manufacturing equipment being transported from Oregon.

The two buildings — the original New York Air Brake building on Purdy Street and a part of the Black Clawson complex on Pearl Street — will be used for warehousing until the company’s mammoth solar panel manufacturing plant in the town of Hounsfield is in operation.

David J. Zembiec, CEO of Jefferson County Economic Development, confirmed that the company will use both buildings for storage.

Equipment from a defunct solar panel plant in Oregon started arriving by truck on Monday. More than 200 trucks are hauling the equipment from a former SunPower Corp. factory in Oregon.

“They started rolling in,” Mr. Zembiec said. “They expected them to come in on Tuesday and they started coming in on Monday.”

The former Black Clawson building at 511 Pearl St., most recently used by a metal scrap company, is a 70,000-square-foot warehouse, while the Air Brake structure, at 100 Purdy St., is currently 52,000 square feet.

Continue Reading on NNY360
Go to Top